Disable Office 365 Password Expiration

Office 365 has a password policy, which is by default set to expire on a regular basis (90 days). There are some guidelines which help to make sure that the password is secure:

  • Use 8 to 16 characters
  • combination of upper- and lowercase letters
  • at leat one numer or one symbol (be aware that the symbol is available in every language on every keyboard)
  • Do not use spaces, tabs, line breaks, your user name

Each user is able to change his password at any time. If a user forgets his password it can be reset by an Office 365 administrator.

In some cases – for example for service accounts – it is useful to change the password expiration policy to never expire.

In this post I will show you how you can disable the password expiration.

In office 365 you need only two lines to disable the password policy. First open the Microsoft Online Services Module for Windows Powershell. (Download: 32bit or 64bit).

Connect to Office 365

Connect-MsolService

In the dialog enter the credentials of an administrator:

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To change a single user:

Set-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName <username> -PasswordNeverExpires $True

To change all users at once:

Get-MsolUser | Set-MsolUser -PasswordNeverExpires $True

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That’s it. You can control the result with the following command:

Get-MsolUser | fl

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Exchange Online: How to add signatures and disclaimers

For years there have been numerous products on the market for Exchange Server that automatically add signatures to outbound emails.

These products traditionally need to run on the Exchange Server and retrieve information from Active Directory. There is also usually a PC-based console on which to create the signatures and administer the system.

These solutions also exist for Exchange Online in Office 365, however this is also possible without any on-premise systems using native Exchange Online functionality. All it takes is a little bit of reading to understand the variables involved.

Jesper Osgaard wrote a similar piece on his TechNet blog, however in this post I have gone a couple of steps further.

Before starting it is important to have your user information up to date in the Office 365 administration portal. It is assumed that first name & last name are fine, however if you want to automate things such as phone numbers, address details – these need to be present in the user properties.

The first step is to log into the Microsoft Online Portal (https://portal.microsoftonline.com) and select the option to Manage Exchange Online settings via Admin > Exchange.

You’ll then need to select the Mail Flow menu option which will open up in the Rules sub-section.

Rules

At this point we begin defining our rule. Select the options as per the screenshot below.

Specify the variables you want to use from the following list:

  • DisplayName
  • FirstName
  • Initials
  • LastName
  • Office
  • PhoneNumber
  • OtherPhoneNumber
  • Email
  • Street
  • POBox
  • City
  • State
  • ZipCode
  • Country
  • UserLogonName
  • HomePhoneNumber
  • OtherHomePhoneNumber
  • PagerNumber
  • MobileNumber
  • FaxNumber
  • OtherFaxNumber
  • Notes
  • Title
  • Department
  • Company
  • Manager
  • CustomAttribute1 to CutomAttribute15

This will show up as blank text, however if you have any HTML or CSS skills you can use these to improve the aesthetics. Also linking to graphics such as company logos is supported – however you may find that the recipients company may block calling external files within an email.

Select OK, and the rule is applied immediately.

Here is what the end result looks like:

The problem is if you don’t set an exception – your email signature / disclaimer will be added to each additional reply:

So going back to the Exchange Online rule, open up the signature rule you created and select More Options:

We’re now able to add an exception which allows the rule to be ignored if the email is a reply.

Under the exception menu select The subject includes… and add “RE:” to the field.

Press OK, save the rule, and now we’ll see that the rule isn’t applied on a reply:

Obviously the signature I’ve created in this example is quite plain, so it would be a good idea to get a web designer involved who can write the relevant HTML & CSS to make the signature appear more to your liking.

You now have fully functional automatic signatures! No need to configure Outlook for every new user, and a great way to keep a standard signature across all users.